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A community for the dragon language of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Thuum.org

A community for the dragon language of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Summary of the new dragon words from TESO

 1 

Kahvozein
January 9, 2020

All these new words come from the Elder Scrolls Online

(Book : "Wisdom of the Flying Gods" / Dialogues : "Nahfahlaar")

 

Dey (adj. false)

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word means "False" but in the context of the sentence it means "Implausible", "Laughably false", "Foolish".

 

Dovahzin (n. dragon name)

"It is an honor that few mortals have received from my kind. Dovahzin. A dragon name." (Nahfahlaar)

This word means "Dragon name", it is composed of "Dovah" (dragon) and "Zin" (honor).

 

Fen (n. will / desire)

"Fenjuntiid. The will of my father, the Dragon King of Time." (Nahfahlaar)

We already know the word "Fen" as a modal verb used to indicate future action, but it seems that it can also be used as a noun meaning "Will" or "Desire".

 

Fey (n. grove)

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word means "Grove" and is related to "Feykro" (forest).

 

Fez (n. outcome)

"Vomindok fez. An unexpected outcome." (Nahfahlaar)

This word means "Outcome / Result / Effect" and could be related to "Dez" (Fate).

 

Han (prep. above)

"Dragon King above. Bormahu han zu’u. (lit. Akatosh above me)" (Nahfahlaar)

This word means "Above", either physically or metaphorically (like in a hierarchy).

 

Jiid (n. moon)

"Nid jiid, nid kun." (No moon, no moonlight.)

This word means "Moon". The word "Kun" (light) is translated as "Moonlight" in the context.

 

Jol (adj. unsteady)

"Rul jol, lok." (When unsteady, rise.)

This word means "Unsteady" and is an antonym for "Ro" (balance). In the book we can read : "Brace yourself and push yourself harder above the turbulent winds." The last two words refer to "Unsteady", so "Jol" could also be a synonym for "Kest" (tempest) and "Strun" (storm).

 

Lok (v. to rise)

"Rul jol, lok." (When unsteady, rise.)

We already know the word "Lok" which initially means "Sky". In the context of the sentence, this word is a synonym for "Alok" (to rise, arise). The two words look very similar, by the way.

 

Luft (v. to face)

"Luft dinokiil." (Face your death.)

This sentence is spoken by the Dragon Priest Korthor. We already know the word "Luft" (n. face) but it seems that it can also be used as a verb (to face).

Note : The initial sentence is "Luft dinokii" which is a mistake as the suffix for "your" is "-iil" and not "-ii" (his/her/its).

 

Miir (n. path)

"Nihnzey miir wah viik." (Betrayal is the path to defeat.)

This word means "Path" and is related to "Miiraad" (door, doorway) and "Miiraak" (portal) . Just like "Miiraad", "Miir" can also have a metaphorical meaning, when something leads you to a certain situation or state. We can notice that the word "Miiraak" is composed of "Miir" (path) and "Aak" (guide), I don't know if this is deliberate or just a coincidence.

 

Ni- (pref. not)

"Dov nifaas wiixseroth." (Dragons fear not a trap of vines.)

We already know this word (which means "not") but it seems that it can also be used as a prefix to form the negation.

 

Nihn (n. poison)

"Nihnzey miir wah viik." (Betrayal is the path to defeat.)

This word literally means "Poison" (as a noun) and "Poisoned" (as an adjective). It could also mean "Corrupt" in some cases (see "Zey" just below).

 

On (n. "spirit")

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word is the most unclear of the list. According to the author, it means "Soul" or "Spirit" but is more 'empty' and 'lifeless'. Maybe it could mean "Entity" or "Presence", a mysterious spirit that is said to exist but not to be fully alive.

 

Ron (n. rain)

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word means "Rain" and could possibly be the verb "to rain".

 

Roth (n. vine)

"Dov nifaas wiixseroth." (Dragons fear not a trap of vines.)

This word means "Vine" and could also refers to "Bramble" (in the french version of the book, the word means "Ronces" = "Brambles").

 

Sov (n. shock)

"Nunon mey bo strun voqostiid naal sov." (Only a fool flies in a storm and is surprised by the shock.)

Surprisingly, this word is one of the few homographs of the language. In fact, "Sov" initially means "to spend" but it seems that it also means "Shock".

 

Voqostiid (adj. surprised)

"Nunon mey bo strun voqostiid naal sov." (Only a fool flies in a storm and is surprised by the shock.)

This word is composed of the prefix "Vo-" (un-) and "Qostiid" (prophecy, what is foreseen). Here, "Voqostiid" is translated as "Surprised" : literally "When someone is not warned"), "Qostiid" can therefore also be considered as a verb meaning "to warn" or "to prophecy". So it becomes a synonym for "Prodah".

 

Wiix (n. trap)

"Dov nifaas wiixseroth." (Dragons fear not a trap of vines.)

This word is a synonym for "Horvut", it refers to a physical trap.

 

Zey (n. brother)

"Nihnzey miir wah viik." (Betrayal is the path to defeat.)

At first glance we might say it's a synonym for "Zeymah", but I think they're slightly different. In the sentence, "Nihnzey" is translated as "Betrayal" or literally "Poisoned brother" (as seen in the notes in the book), but since the word refers to betrayal in general, "Zey" could mean "Fraternity" or "Solidarity". This distinction between "Zey" and "Zeymah" is very similar to the one concerning "Dov" and "Dovah" (both in spelling and meaning). In fact, "Dov" refers to the race of dragons (whereas "Dovah" most often refers to an individual dragon) and in the same way "Zey" could refer to the fraternity in general (and "Zeymah" to a specific brother). Finally, "Nihnzey" is literally translated as "Poisoned brother", in this case "Nihn" (poison) could also mean "Corrupt".

 

Zoor (n. myth)

"Zoor drun qalos. Myth made manifest." (Nahfahlaar)

This word initially means "Legend" and is used to characterize someone for his/her heroic deeds, but it seems that it can also be used to refer to a myth, a legendary event or even a tale, not only a person.

 

Feel free to share your opinion and warn if you see any mistake (in Dovahzul or in English) in order to improve this thread. Thank you !

 

 

by Kahvozein
January 9, 2020

All these new words come from the Elder Scrolls Online

(Book : "Wisdom of the Flying Gods" / Dialogues : "Nahfahlaar")

 

Dey (adj. false)

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word means "False" but in the context of the sentence it means "Implausible", "Laughably false", "Foolish".

 

Dovahzin (n. dragon name)

"It is an honor that few mortals have received from my kind. Dovahzin. A dragon name." (Nahfahlaar)

This word means "Dragon name", it is composed of "Dovah" (dragon) and "Zin" (honor).

 

Fen (n. will / desire)

"Fenjuntiid. The will of my father, the Dragon King of Time." (Nahfahlaar)

We already know the word "Fen" as a modal verb used to indicate future action, but it seems that it can also be used as a noun meaning "Will" or "Desire".

 

Fey (n. grove)

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word means "Grove" and is related to "Feykro" (forest).

 

Fez (n. outcome)

"Vomindok fez. An unexpected outcome." (Nahfahlaar)

This word means "Outcome / Result / Effect" and could be related to "Dez" (Fate).

 

Han (prep. above)

"Dragon King above. Bormahu han zu’u. (lit. Akatosh above me)" (Nahfahlaar)

This word means "Above", either physically or metaphorically (like in a hierarchy).

 

Jiid (n. moon)

"Nid jiid, nid kun." (No moon, no moonlight.)

This word means "Moon". The word "Kun" (light) is translated as "Moonlight" in the context.

 

Jol (adj. unsteady)

"Rul jol, lok." (When unsteady, rise.)

This word means "Unsteady" and is an antonym for "Ro" (balance). In the book we can read : "Brace yourself and push yourself harder above the turbulent winds." The last two words refer to "Unsteady", so "Jol" could also be a synonym for "Kest" (tempest) and "Strun" (storm).

 

Lok (v. to rise)

"Rul jol, lok." (When unsteady, rise.)

We already know the word "Lok" which initially means "Sky". In the context of the sentence, this word is a synonym for "Alok" (to rise, arise). The two words look very similar, by the way.

 

Luft (v. to face)

"Luft dinokiil." (Face your death.)

This sentence is spoken by the Dragon Priest Korthor. We already know the word "Luft" (n. face) but it seems that it can also be used as a verb (to face).

Note : The initial sentence is "Luft dinokii" which is a mistake as the suffix for "your" is "-iil" and not "-ii" (his/her/its).

 

Miir (n. path)

"Nihnzey miir wah viik." (Betrayal is the path to defeat.)

This word means "Path" and is related to "Miiraad" (door, doorway) and "Miiraak" (portal) . Just like "Miiraad", "Miir" can also have a metaphorical meaning, when something leads you to a certain situation or state. We can notice that the word "Miiraak" is composed of "Miir" (path) and "Aak" (guide), I don't know if this is deliberate or just a coincidence.

 

Ni- (pref. not)

"Dov nifaas wiixseroth." (Dragons fear not a trap of vines.)

We already know this word (which means "not") but it seems that it can also be used as a prefix to form the negation.

 

Nihn (n. poison)

"Nihnzey miir wah viik." (Betrayal is the path to defeat.)

This word literally means "Poison" (as a noun) and "Poisoned" (as an adjective). It could also mean "Corrupt" in some cases (see "Zey" just below).

 

On (n. "spirit")

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word is the most unclear of the list. According to the author, it means "Soul" or "Spirit" but is more 'empty' and 'lifeless'. Maybe it could mean "Entity" or "Presence", a mysterious spirit that is said to exist but not to be fully alive.

 

Ron (n. rain)

"Dey on folook fey ko ven ahrk ron." (Implausible spirits haunt a grove in the wind and rain.)

This word means "Rain" and could possibly be the verb "to rain".

 

Roth (n. vine)

"Dov nifaas wiixseroth." (Dragons fear not a trap of vines.)

This word means "Vine" and could also refers to "Bramble" (in the french version of the book, the word means "Ronces" = "Brambles").

 

Sov (n. shock)

"Nunon mey bo strun voqostiid naal sov." (Only a fool flies in a storm and is surprised by the shock.)

Surprisingly, this word is one of the few homographs of the language. In fact, "Sov" initially means "to spend" but it seems that it also means "Shock".

 

Voqostiid (adj. surprised)

"Nunon mey bo strun voqostiid naal sov." (Only a fool flies in a storm and is surprised by the shock.)

This word is composed of the prefix "Vo-" (un-) and "Qostiid" (prophecy, what is foreseen). Here, "Voqostiid" is translated as "Surprised" : literally "When someone is not warned"), "Qostiid" can therefore also be considered as a verb meaning "to warn" or "to prophecy". So it becomes a synonym for "Prodah".

 

Wiix (n. trap)

"Dov nifaas wiixseroth." (Dragons fear not a trap of vines.)

This word is a synonym for "Horvut", it refers to a physical trap.

 

Zey (n. brother)

"Nihnzey miir wah viik." (Betrayal is the path to defeat.)

At first glance we might say it's a synonym for "Zeymah", but I think they're slightly different. In the sentence, "Nihnzey" is translated as "Betrayal" or literally "Poisoned brother" (as seen in the notes in the book), but since the word refers to betrayal in general, "Zey" could mean "Fraternity" or "Solidarity". This distinction between "Zey" and "Zeymah" is very similar to the one concerning "Dov" and "Dovah" (both in spelling and meaning). In fact, "Dov" refers to the race of dragons (whereas "Dovah" most often refers to an individual dragon) and in the same way "Zey" could refer to the fraternity in general (and "Zeymah" to a specific brother). Finally, "Nihnzey" is literally translated as "Poisoned brother", in this case "Nihn" (poison) could also mean "Corrupt".

 

Zoor (n. myth)

"Zoor drun qalos. Myth made manifest." (Nahfahlaar)

This word initially means "Legend" and is used to characterize someone for his/her heroic deeds, but it seems that it can also be used to refer to a myth, a legendary event or even a tale, not only a person.

 

Feel free to share your opinion and warn if you see any mistake (in Dovahzul or in English) in order to improve this thread. Thank you !

 

 


Vendla
April 16, 2020

Thank you very much! Please tell us something new from TESO when it comes about because not everyone has opportunity for it.

by Vendla
April 16, 2020

Thank you very much! Please tell us something new from TESO when it comes about because not everyone has opportunity for it.


Kahvozein
April 16, 2020
@Vendla Well, the thing is that I don't even have TESO myself. I just checked the wiki to find these words and this book is pretty much all we have new about Dovahzul. But I'll definitely update this thread if I find new vocabulary.
by Kahvozein
April 16, 2020
@Vendla Well, the thing is that I don't even have TESO myself. I just checked the wiki to find these words and this book is pretty much all we have new about Dovahzul. But I'll definitely update this thread if I find new vocabulary.

Zinrahzul
April 18, 2020

Check out the UESP page for Dovahzul and its sources listed on the bottom. They seem to be keeping up with new ESO additions. I feel it would be important to scrub the dragon names as well as all dialog from ESO to maybe get hints into translations.

Another thought is to analyze ESO shouts to see if they pull what ESO has been doing to Dovahzul -- taking the root of Skyrim words and defining them. For example, feykro is forest, but in ESO, fey is "glade". Miiraad is "door", but "miir" in ESO is "way/path".

http://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dragon_Language

Nahfaalaar's dialog also has some example Dovahzul! Check the link: http://en.uesp.net/wiki/Online:Nahfahlaar

by Zinrahzul
April 18, 2020

Check out the UESP page for Dovahzul and its sources listed on the bottom. They seem to be keeping up with new ESO additions. I feel it would be important to scrub the dragon names as well as all dialog from ESO to maybe get hints into translations.

Another thought is to analyze ESO shouts to see if they pull what ESO has been doing to Dovahzul -- taking the root of Skyrim words and defining them. For example, feykro is forest, but in ESO, fey is "glade". Miiraad is "door", but "miir" in ESO is "way/path".

http://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dragon_Language

Nahfaalaar's dialog also has some example Dovahzul! Check the link: http://en.uesp.net/wiki/Online:Nahfahlaar


Kahvozein
May 5, 2020
Here are the phrases that contain interesting dovahzul material :

« Pahklok, what shameful arrogance. » (Probably a misspelling of « Pahlok »)

« Kaaz Kaal Sul : The Pride of Alkosh, in your tongue. Khajiiti warriors of ages past. » (Here, the word « Sul » is related to « Ages past »)

« It is you, hunter. Dezu. Time blurs. It is the same as before. » (« Dezu » probably means « Our fate »)

« Fenjuntiid. The will of my father, the Dragon King of Time. » (Here, « Fen » is used as a noun to express « Desire », it’s not only a modal verb to indicate future action anymore)

« Zoor drun qalos. Myth made manifest. A trick of the mask and nothing more. » (« Zoor » now means « Myth », not only refers to a person for his deeds. The meaning of « Qalos » was unclear, now it seems that it means « Manifest »)

« Dragon King above. Bormahu han zu’u. » (« Han » is either a new word that means « Above » or a misspelling of « Hon » : Akatosh hears me.)

« This mortal is worthy. Wah vokrii krentiid. They shall mend your threads. » (« Krentiid » = Broken time, it is unclear, I’m not sure of what it could mean here)

« Ahkahtuz. It is an honor that few mortals have received from my kind. Dovahzin. A dragon name. Once, I called you hunter. Now you are Ahkahtuz. You are hunter still, yes. But now you are proud, unbroken. Bound to my father’s will. And so I honor you with a Dragon’s name. » (« Ahkahtuz » = Hunter-Pride-Blade. The word « Dovahzin » is used to say « Dragon name », literally « Dragon’s honor »)

« Vomindok fez. An unexpected outcome » (The word « Fez » either is a new word to say « Outcome », or a misspelling of « Dez » = Fate)

« Suleyki hin ! » (To say « is yours » the verb « los » is optional »



by Kahvozein
May 5, 2020
Here are the phrases that contain interesting dovahzul material :



« Pahklok, what shameful arrogance. » (Probably a misspelling of « Pahlok »)



« Kaaz Kaal Sul : The Pride of Alkosh, in your tongue. Khajiiti warriors of ages past. » (Here, the word « Sul » is related to « Ages past »)



« It is you, hunter. Dezu. Time blurs. It is the same as before. » (« Dezu » probably means « Our fate »)



« Fenjuntiid. The will of my father, the Dragon King of Time. » (Here, « Fen » is used as a noun to express « Desire », it’s not only a modal verb to indicate future action anymore)



« Zoor drun qalos. Myth made manifest. A trick of the mask and nothing more. » (« Zoor » now means « Myth », not only refers to a person for his deeds. The meaning of « Qalos » was unclear, now it seems that it means « Manifest »)



« Dragon King above. Bormahu han zu’u. » (« Han » is either a new word that means « Above » or a misspelling of « Hon » : Akatosh hears me.)



« This mortal is worthy. Wah vokrii krentiid. They shall mend your threads. » (« Krentiid » = Broken time, it is unclear, I’m not sure of what it could mean here)



« Ahkahtuz. It is an honor that few mortals have received from my kind. Dovahzin. A dragon name. Once, I called you hunter. Now you are Ahkahtuz. You are hunter still, yes. But now you are proud, unbroken. Bound to my father’s will. And so I honor you with a Dragon’s name. » (« Ahkahtuz » = Hunter-Pride-Blade. The word « Dovahzin » is used to say « Dragon name », literally « Dragon’s honor »)



« Vomindok fez. An unexpected outcome » (The word « Fez » either is a new word to say « Outcome », or a misspelling of « Dez » = Fate)



« Suleyki hin ! » (To say « is yours » the verb « los » is optional »








Kahvozein
May 5, 2020

These are the shouts I could find in youtube videos. For each video, I left a comment with time codes to the moment when the shout is used.

 

Qeth Kriid Gol (Earth Spike)
 


Krii Lun Aus (Marked for Death)

Tiid Klo Ul (Time Stop)

Mid Vur Shaan (Elemental Fury)

Vah Yol Ron (Fire Storm/Fireball Rain)

Tiid Grah Kron (???)

Jiid So Daan (Meteor Storm Call)

 


Du Kun Shaan (Store Lunar Energy)

Diiv Mir Tah (Summon Wyrm)

Sos Jiid Viin (Moon Blast/Ray)

Al Gron Nok (Summon Atronach)

Sov Ag Slen (Lightning Breath)




Jiid So Daan (Meteor Storm Call)

Fus Ro Dah (Unrelenting Force)




Golt Mah Nos (Aerial Unrelenting Force, explodes on impact)



Qeth Krii Gol (Earth Spike)

Tiid Klo Ul (Time Stop)

Toor Vol Daan (Dark Aeon Breath / Green Fire Breath)

 

That's all what I could find for the moment :)


kdemoose
August 31, 2020
Is there a word for priestess or dragon priestess?
by kdemoose
August 31, 2020
Is there a word for priestess or dragon priestess?

Zinrahzul
September 1, 2020
kdemoose
Is there a word for priestess or dragon priestess?

As far as I know, we just use "Sonaak" as gender neutral "dragon priest".

by Zinrahzul
September 1, 2020
kdemoose
Is there a word for priestess or dragon priestess?

As far as I know, we just use "Sonaak" as gender neutral "dragon priest".