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A community for the dragon language of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Thuum.org

A community for the dragon language of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Hin vs Him

 1 

paarthurnax
Administrator
August 9, 2014

Traditionally, hin is the word used to mean "your." The spelling him appears in one of Alduin's lines:

"Meyye! Tahrodiis aanne! Him hinde pah liiv! Zu'u hin daan!"

Do you think this is a typo, or is there perhaps some grammar behind it? Hin is used in the very next sentence, so unless the script wasn't proofread at all, this would seem strange. On the other hand, this line features three typos (aanne should be aarre "slaves," hinde should be hindde "wishes," him should be hin), so it's entirely possible. I can find no other occurences of him.

The main reason I think grammar might have a hand is because hin hindde wouldn't be the most graceful to pronounce, so perhaps hin becomes him similar to how "a" because "an" before a word with a vowel. In this case the rule seems harder to define; the next word must begin with a vowel or approximate consonant ("h," "r," or "y") and it's first syllable must end with "n." Thus we might get:

  • Him hun "your hero" (vs. hin hun)
  • Him in "your master" (vs. hin in)
  • Him rein "your roar" (vs. hin rein)
  • Him hahnu "your dream" (vs. hin hahnu)
  • Him hungaar zahrahmiik "your heroic sacrifice" (vs. hin hungaar zahrahmiik)
by paarthurnax
August 9, 2014

Traditionally, hin is the word used to mean "your." The spelling him appears in one of Alduin's lines:

"Meyye! Tahrodiis aanne! Him hinde pah liiv! Zu'u hin daan!"

Do you think this is a typo, or is there perhaps some grammar behind it? Hin is used in the very next sentence, so unless the script wasn't proofread at all, this would seem strange. On the other hand, this line features three typos (aanne should be aarre "slaves," hinde should be hindde "wishes," him should be hin), so it's entirely possible. I can find no other occurences of him.

The main reason I think grammar might have a hand is because hin hindde wouldn't be the most graceful to pronounce, so perhaps hin becomes him similar to how "a" because "an" before a word with a vowel. In this case the rule seems harder to define; the next word must begin with a vowel or approximate consonant ("h," "r," or "y") and it's first syllable must end with "n." Thus we might get:

  • Him hun "your hero" (vs. hin hun)
  • Him in "your master" (vs. hin in)
  • Him rein "your roar" (vs. hin rein)
  • Him hahnu "your dream" (vs. hin hahnu)
  • Him hungaar zahrahmiik "your heroic sacrifice" (vs. hin hungaar zahrahmiik)

Ahmuldein
August 10, 2014

I honestly dont know, Im not very good in English grammar and this is mostly based off of English, but i assume from what i know of English that it is most likely a typo. Personally, i dont know but GOD FORBID we contact Bethesda! Uhg! They only know what is indirect answers!

by Ahmuldein
August 10, 2014

I honestly dont know, Im not very good in English grammar and this is mostly based off of English, but i assume from what i know of English that it is most likely a typo. Personally, i dont know but GOD FORBID we contact Bethesda! Uhg! They only know what is indirect answers!


Mul klo riik
September 6, 2014

Lingrah morah, I came to the conclusion that; "hinde" is a typo, and "him" could have been a typo but is probably their for the very reason you stated. however, when I was listening to Alduin, I interpreted it like this, "Fools, treacherous, numerous!" or, "Multiple, treacherous fools!" Aan means "a," or "an", which makes the following noun singular, so aanne must mean "multiple ones," To put it bluntly, my theory is that "aanne" is a preposition, as far as I know, not present in English.

by Mul klo riik
September 6, 2014

Lingrah morah, I came to the conclusion that; "hinde" is a typo, and "him" could have been a typo but is probably their for the very reason you stated. however, when I was listening to Alduin, I interpreted it like this, "Fools, treacherous, numerous!" or, "Multiple, treacherous fools!" Aan means "a," or "an", which makes the following noun singular, so aanne must mean "multiple ones," To put it bluntly, my theory is that "aanne" is a preposition, as far as I know, not present in English.


Mirkrilaar
Moderator
September 6, 2014
Ahmuldein

I honestly dont know, Im not very good in English grammar and this is mostly based off of English, but i assume from what i know of English that it is most likely a typo. Personally, i dont know but GOD FORBID we contact Bethesda! Uhg! They only know what is indirect answers!

Vahzen! Based off of previous ecpreience with contacting them, sadly to say, they would not be any help. They would most likely just assume that it is a typo of "hin" that they didnt correct or something.

by Mirkrilaar
September 6, 2014
Ahmuldein

I honestly dont know, Im not very good in English grammar and this is mostly based off of English, but i assume from what i know of English that it is most likely a typo. Personally, i dont know but GOD FORBID we contact Bethesda! Uhg! They only know what is indirect answers!

Vahzen! Based off of previous ecpreience with contacting them, sadly to say, they would not be any help. They would most likely just assume that it is a typo of "hin" that they didnt correct or something.


Mirkrilaar
Moderator
September 6, 2014

But...looking it up on http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dragon_Language#H does prove that they have the same meaning, just a different spelling.

by Mirkrilaar
September 6, 2014

But...looking it up on http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dragon_Language#H does prove that they have the same meaning, just a different spelling.

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